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Crewel Embroidery

Discover Pinterest’s 10 best ideas and inspiration for Crewel Embroidery. Get inspired and try out new things.

All of the Making

talkingclay: “5 colour rows in I knit in the morning while I am waking up with my coffee and in the evening while we are watching something on Netflix. ”

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Learn basic stitches easily,visit my YouTube channel #EmbroideryArt

Hello There!I invite everyone to learn hand embroidery, how to do DIY stitches, Khatli work, Aari work and unique handicraft techniques on my channel. You wi...

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Stem Stitch Rose with Knotted Center - Tutorial

Today's stitching time was spent playing with a couple of stitches in the company of one of my favorite embroidery books and my doodle cloth. The book is written in Japanese, so I can't make out a word from the instructions, but the photos and diagrams are almost sufficient to understand the stitches. Almost. To make out the rest of the "secrets", there's always the doodle cloth :) There was a cute little flower in the book, starting with some sort of a knot (if you know its proper name, please drop me a note, thank you) that I wanted to try out. Loved the way it turned out, added a few stem stitches to it, and there it was, a lovely, delicate rose, stitched with 6 strands of pink variegated DMC stranded cotton: To stitch this rose first imagine (ha!) a small square, as marked on the photo below. Bring your needle up in 1 and take it down in 2. Come up in 3, and you will get a small straight stitch: The next stitch will not go through the fabric, but under the straight stitch: bring your working thread down over the straight stitch and slide your needle under the straight stitch, pulling to the left of your working thread. Then slide your needle under the straight stitch again, over the working thread, pull your thread through to form a knot and take your needle down in 4 (the upper right corner of our imaginary square). Now you have a lovely knot, which can stand by itself as a small flower, for instance, or as a filling stitch along with French and colonial knots. Or you can take it forward, by bringing your needle up between 3 and 4 (the center of the top line) And making loops by sliding the needle under the little "legs" of the knot and over the working thread (just like stem stitching except not through the fabric) weaving all around the four "legs" When you have woven the fourth leg, you could take your needle down again in the center of the upper line, (just where you came up to make the loops) and you would have a smaller rose, or you could make a bigger rose, by adding more petals - stem stitching around your rose until it gets to the desired size: When you have enough petals, finish your rose by bringing your needle down to the back of the fabric at an angle as shown in the photo below and start making another rose and then another one... Isn't this fun?! Oops, maybe I got a little carried away LOL In the next post I'll show you how I stitched little rose buds, starting with the same knot as the rose and some cute leaves, too. Hope you are having a fun day, Everyone!

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Lisa Congdon Hand Embroidery Kit - Birds

You may not be able to draw like Lisa Congdon, but you can now stitch like her! The super popular fine artist and illustrator has translated some of her whimsical drawings into embroidery kits suitable for all levels of stitchers. The charm and energy of Lisa's illustrations are captured in just a few simple stitches. The pattern is pre-printed on the cotton fabric, so there is no need for transferring or tracing, which means you can get stitching right away! The kit has everything you need. The finished design fits into the included 5" by 9" embroidery hoop. Kit contents: Fabric with pre-printed design Full skeins of embroidery floss Needle Wooden embroidery hoop Stitching guide  All packaging is recyclable and/or reusable.

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Needlepainting tips part 8: Importance of correct direction

Before we start, an important announcement! I'm having a SALE in my Etsy shop: everything is down 15% until the end of March. Hurry up to make your purchase, especially if you already have my designs in the cart! Now, let's get back to the topic :) When you work long and short stitch, one of your main goals should be the correct direction of your stitches. As long as you achieve that, the surface of your stitching will be smooth, and the blending will be easier. Here are two examples. On the left is what my long and short stitch looks like nowadays, and where I'm paying attention to the direction of stitches. On the right is the result of me channeling my former confused beginner self, where I would easily put stitches in the wrong direction. To get my point across better, here are both of the examples with “guiding lines” drawn over the stitching. Take a closer look yourself, first, and try to see the difference in stitching. {ay attention to the direction of my stitches in both examples. Now, a large part of the improvement is due to practicing, of course. But even when you are a beginner and don't have big baggage of worked long and short stitching, there are still some tips for you! Tips for correct direction of stitches 1. Drawing guiding lines First of all, you can draw the guiding lines right on the ground fabric. Often times, authors of embroidery designs already provide you with directions of stitches in their diagrams. But you can also draw it yourself. I usually draw them myself with a standard pencil because it leaves me with more freedom – I can draw as many guiding lines as I need. And sometimes, the way I “feel” the shape, would be slightly different than how the author sees it so I may draw them differently. And I think that's valid too. If in your mind the “strokes” of stitches lie differently, I would recommend following your guts. It would be easier for you to work because otherwise, you would have a slight dissonance between what you see on the diagram and in your mind. 2. Guiding stitches When you gain a bit more experience, you will probably start choosing only one: either drawing guiding lines, or working guiding stitches. However, in the beginning, you might make use of both, actually. The more detailed is your “planning” of stitching, the less confused you will be about the direction of stitches. Then you start filling the space between the guiding stitches. You can make the guiding stitches for each of the rows of long and short stitching. Another way of working guiding stitches is to use running stitching as your guiding lines. It works just as well. Except, that it would be more convenient to work in 1 color, of course. And if you plan to use several colors to create a blending effect, that might be a problem. Otherwise, if you're using long and short stitch as a filler in 1 color, or if your blending is more “vertical” and you don't mind throwing some colors here and there, then there is no harm at all. 3 Pulling the working thread to find the right direction When you are confused about where you should insert the needle for your stitch to lie perfectly in line with the one from the previous row, you can pull the working end of thread and then insert the needle at the suitable point. I constantly use this method, it's like a norm. And because of that I don't always draw guiding lines on the fabric. This way of pulling thread is quite enough. However, there can be different situations. This method largely suits the situation when you need to lay your stitches along straight lines. But the shape could have some curves, it can be round or oval, and then this method would be less helpful. Nevertheless, it is still a great habit to develop and make use of! So here is the finished result of the heart with “correct” direction of stitches. How about seeing the process of working the other one? Here is me, not using any guiding lines, but just working some stitches over the outline. At first glance, it might not seem too bad. But if you look closer and try to continue the lines of the stitches in your mind, you would notice how some of them are bound to cross. Which is not very good. When you start working the second row, the problem becomes more evident. You see how the direction of stitches is changing all the time? Well, I put myself a goal to complete the shape no matter what, while still imagining myself a confused beginner stitcher, and here is the result. Take a closer look at the stitches' direction to understand the difference with another heart. I mean, it actually isn't that bad. The shape is complete and the colors are there. If you look at it from a distance you might not even notice any problem. But there is still room for improvement too. So, I hope today's tips will be helpful in your next project! Check all the previous posts under the tag “needlepainting tips” for more advice!

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#flower embroidery

Hello There!I invite everyone to learn hand embroidery, how to do DIY stitches, Khatli work, Aari work and unique handicraft techniques on my channel. You wi...

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