Japanese Food

Various fish, shellfish and other seafood from the oceans, lakes and rivers are used in the Japanese cuisine. They are prepared and eaten in many different ways, such as raw, dried, boiled, grilled, deep fried or steamed. Presentation of Japanese dishes is very important not only to the consumer but also to the chef.
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A bowl with rice and juicy stew goes very well with hot Japanese green tea.

The Tsukiji Market in Tokyo is the largest wholesale seafood market in the world handling over tonnes of marine products per day. The traditional market, a dependable source for Japanese cooks and seafood aficionados, will relocate in

Window Wax Menu, at a Restaurant in Ginza, Tokyo.

Window Wax Menu, at a Restaurant in Ginza, Tokyo.

“Marusei” Butter Cookies, a confection made with a mix of Hokkaido butter, California raisins, and white chocolate, sandwiched with butter biscuits. Floral designs by Japanese botanist and painter Naoyuki Sakamoto.

Otaru — A quaint little town where music is in the air (Includes first-hand account)

A worker slices pieces of tuna using a “Maguro bōchō” (tuna knife). The tuna cutters have an extremely long, narrow blade, and a long handle.

The Tsukiji Market in Tokyo is the largest wholesale seafood market in the world handling over tonnes of marine products per day. The traditional market, a dependable source for Japanese cooks and seafood aficionados, will relocate in

Miso Ramen at Ramen Alley in Susukino, Sapporo.

Miso Ramen at Ramen Alley in Susukino, Sapporo.

Seafood display at Nishiki Market in Kyoto.

Seafood display at Nishiki Market in Kyoto.

Wax menu at a Japanese Restaurant in Sapporo.

Wax menu at a Japanese Restaurant in Sapporo.

Blowfish (fugu) are covered with spines and contain a toxin about 100 times more poisonous than cyanide; however they are considered a delicacy and a highly coveted meal in Japanese cuisine.

Fact - It takes about 11 years of intensive to become a poisonous blowfish


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