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Margaret Bourke-White | Solitary Dog Sculptor I: Photos: Margaret Bourke White - Part 3

Solitary Dog Sculptor I: Photo: Margaret Bourke White

Margaret Bourke-White becomes the first female photojournalist to be allowed into combat zones—paving the way for women in the field of photography.

Margaret Bourke-White Successful women outside of the home: Margaret Bourke-White becomes the first female photojournalist allowed into combat zones, paving the way for women in the field of photography.

wandrlust:  Margaret Bourke-White working at the top of the Chrysler Building, New York, New York, 1935.

Photographer Margaret Bourke-White on a gargoyle at the top of the Chrysler Building, New York, photo by Oscar Graubner. She was the female photographer for Life magazine and first female war correspondent

Margaret Bourke, 1930s

Learning Overhead Photography From Vintage Perspectives

indubio: “ preciousandfregilethings: icancauseaconstellation: Margaret Bourke-White Hats in the Garment District, New York, 1930 ”

Photojournalist Margaret Bourke-White at work with her large format camera in 1934

Margaret Bourke-White fearless American photographer and photojournalist, first foreign photographer permitted access to teh Soviet Union, first female war correspondent, first Life magazine cover photographer

Margaret Bourke-White ---Metaphotography on the Chrysler Building.  She was the first photographer for Fortune magazine (1929) and the first female photojournalist to be hired by Life Magazine (1935).

Margaret Bourke-White ---Metaphotography on the Chrysler Building. She was the first photographer for Fortune magazine and the first female photojournalist to be hired by Life Magazine Photo Oscar Graubner

Margaret Bourke-White, Chrysler Building, 1931

View Chrysler Building, New York City, 1931 c. Time Inc. by Margaret Bourke-White on artnet. Browse more artworks Margaret Bourke-White from Monroe Gallery of Photography.

Margaret Bourke-White #photography @Qomomolo: Line of Russians along street in front of the Kremlin, Moscow, 1941.

A line of Russians along the street in front of the Kremlin in Moscow, by Margaret Bourke-White. From the geography of the square, they may be queuing to visit Lenin's tomb.

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