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Lindos demais!!! Fofos! :) Kazusaichinomiya, Japan Copyright: Takero Kawabata

A big drum, Kazusaichinomiya, Japan Copyright: Takero Kawabata

12 layered kimono

Japanese ancient 12 layers kimono, Juni-hitoe 十二単 this somehow reminds me of the traditional Korean manner of court lady dressing

Japanese Star Festival -Tanabata-: making fun paper ornaments and own tanzaku, thin paper strips for writing wishes, to decorate bamboo branches for this festival.

Tanabata, Star Festival, making fun paper ornaments and own tanzaku, thin paper strips for writing wishes, to decorate bamboo branches for this festival

Kultrun, a traditional drum

Kultrun, a traditional drum

japanska

Japanese girls in yukata: yukata comfortable cotton kimono decorated with stencil-dyed patterns usually in shades of indigo, worn by Japanese men and women. The yukata was originally designed as a nightgown and for wear in the home after a bath.

On April 13th fathers and their young sons purify themselves in the sacred waters of Yunomine Onsen before walking over the Dainichi-goe section of the Kumano Kodo pilgrimage route to Oyunohara wearing traditional costumes. The young boys have the character for big written on their forehead and are forbidden to touch the ground.

On April fathers and their young sons purify themselves in the sacred…

fanny Japanese little boys in kimono

Two Japanese boys offer stiff poses …a festival (on November for children of three, five and seven years of age (or more exactly, for boys of three and five and girls of three and seven).

Огромная подборка от Галочки – 140 поражающих воображение КИМОНО! Раритетные и современные, вышивка и роспись, аппликация и прозрачные кимоно-пеньюары – это настоящие произведения искусства.

Japanese Shinto bride (Hayanome) : Meiji Jingu, Tokyo, Japan / Japón by Lost in Japan, by Miguel dai

Shirakawame – Kyoto Flower Maidens, In Kyoto, Japan’s old capital, right until the first few years of the last century one sure sign of spring was the Shirakawame (白川女), the flower maidens in their special costumes selling flowers on the streets of the city. It is said that the practice started in the Heian period (794-1185) with market ladies delivering flowers to the imperial palace,

Shirakawame – Kyoto Flower Maidens

In Kyoto, Japan’s old capital, right until the first few years of the last century one sure sign of spring was the Shirakawame, the flower maidens in their special costumes selling flowers on the streets of the city. Text and image via Tokyobling

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