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Resultado de imagen para iconografia indigena

Resultado de imagen para iconografia indigena

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This incised maskette reveals an Olmec-style face covered with scrolled patterns on the cheek and a maize icon in the center of the forehead.

This incised maskette reveals an Olmec-style face covered with scrolled patterns on the cheek and a maize icon in the center of the forehead. Maize was a potent symbol of wealth for the Olmec.

They never show you the back of Olmec statue heads

side of giant Olmec head in Mexico at the rear of Monument Q, Tres Zapotes showing Ethiopian style braided hair. Olmec civilization has oriental and black people in Central America

It has never been clear whether the Olmec style represented an Olmec people, and recent archeological investigations cast doubt on this theory, suggesting instead that a significant number of regional sites offer a coherent set of early Mesoamerican architectural vestiges and Olmec style elements, and that there were multiple active partners in the elaboration of a common system of Mesoamerican beliefs and practices.

It has never been clear whether the Olmec style represented an Olmec people, and…

Olmecoid Jade Pectoral - Origin: Mesoamerica, Circa: 900 BCE to 500 BCE

Olmecoid Jade Pectoral - Origin: Mesoamerica Circa: 900 BC to 500 BC Dimensions: high Catalogue: Collection: Pre-Columbian Medium: Jade

Giant Stone Heads of Mexico - Also from San Lorenz, this unusual Stela-Head. Current location, Jalapa Museum.

Giant Stone Heads of Mexico - Also from San Lorenz, this unusual Stela-Head.

Goddess Coyolxauhqui  with the sun stone at her back. National Museum of Anthropology Mexico City mexicas

Goddess Coyolxauhqui with the sun stone at her back. National Museum of Anthropology Mexico City photo credit: Thomas Aleto

Jade, Mexico, Mascaras, Sculpture, Masks

La Venta's large stone sculpture was made of basalt from the Tuxtla mountains far to the north. The Olmec transported these massive basalt boulders by means of the region's meandering rivers, where they were used for thrones, altars, stelae, and colossal heads.

La Venta's large stone sculpture was made of basalt from the Tuxtla mountains…

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Man standing next to Stela K ; near the eastern border of the Great Plaza. Quiriguá is an ancient Maya archaeological site along the lower Montagua river in south-eastern Guatemala. Photographed by Dr Alfred Percival Maudslay in

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